Greetings!

We are glad to inform you that Nandikar’s six-month Actors’ Training Program 2014 is about to begin!

Please find below some Frequently Asked Questions on the Program:

What is this Program about?
It’s the flagship yearly actors’ training program conducted by Nandikar.

When is the training?
It will start on May 1, 2014 and will continue till the end of October, 2014. Workshops will be held every Monday from 5pm to 8pm (three hours) and every Saturday from 3pm to 8pm (five hours).

Where will the workshops happen?
The sessions will happen at the Federation Hall, which is opposite Rajabazar Science College and beside Brahmo Girls School, in Kolkata. Here is a Google map of the place: http://tinyurl.com/fedhall

Who will conduct the sessions?
The program is designed and presided over by Rudraprasad Sengupta.
In-house trainers of Nandikar including Rudraprasad Sengupta, Swatilekha Sengupta, Sohini Sengupta and Nandikar family will conduct the workshops. We also engage gurus from fields like dance, mime and music from time to time.

Who is it for?
The Program is for interested people aged between 18 and 30 years. If found exceptional, we might entertain some people above the age of 30.
(We have a separate round-the-year Sunday program for children between 5 to 18 years divided into three different age groups).

What will be the language of communication?
The sessions will primarily be conducted in Bengali.

Will I get a certificate of participation?
Yes, if you regularly attend the sessions and complete the course you would get a certificate from us stating so.

Will participation in the workshop imply that I become a regular performer of Nandikar’s productions?
Not necessarily. However, we have regularly been inducting new members into our fold through this Program. Such inductions are based on mutual compatibility, engagement and commitment.

Do we have to give an interview to become a part of the Program?
We have an Interaction Session from 5:00pm (reporting time: by 4:45pm) on April 19, 20 and 21 at Federation Hall. Please note that to be able to participate in the Program, it is necessary to take part in the Interaction Session on one of the three days.

 

So, friend, if you find the above arrangement suitable, please give us a call on +91-33-2555-4946 or +91-88205-34215 between 12 noon and 4pm by 18th April for further queries and to book a slot (April 19th/20th/21st)!

In case you have specifically been given a slot already, there is no need to call us again.

Looking forward to hear from you soon.

We are glad to inform you that Nandikar’s six-month Actors’ Training Program 2013 is about to begin!

Please find below some Frequently Asked Questions on the Program:
What is this Program about?
It’s the flagship yearly actors’ training program conducted by Nandikar. The main emphasis will be on theatre acting with additional inputs on video and audio performance (films, television).
When is the training?
It will start on May 1, 2013 and will continue till the end of October, 2013. Workshops will be held every Monday from 5pm to 8pm (3 hours) and every Saturday from 3pm to 8pm (five hours).
Where will the workshops happen?
The sessions will happen at the Federation Hall, which is opposite Rajabazar Science College and beside Brahmo Girls School, in Kolkata. Here is a Google map of the place: http://tinyurl.com/fedhall
Who will conduct the sessions?
The program is designed and presided over by Rudraprasad Sengupta.
In-house trainers of Nandikar including Rudraprasad Sengupta, Swatilekha Sengupta, Sohini Sengupta, Debsankar Halder, Parthapratim Deb, Sumanta Gangopadhyay, Gautam Sarkar will conduct the workshops. We also engage gurus from fields like dance, mime, videography and sound from time to time.
Who is it for?
The Program is for interested people aged between 18 and 30 years. If found exceptional, we might entertain some people above the age of 30.
(We have a separate round-the-year Sunday program for children between 5 to 18 years divided into three different age groups).
What will be the language of communication?
The sessions will primarily be conducted in Bengali.
Will I get a certificate of participation?
Yes, if you regularly attend the sessions and complete the course you would get a certificate from us stating so.
Will participation in the workshop imply that I become a regular performer of Nandikar’s productions?
Not necessarily. However, we have regularly been inducting new members into our fold through this Program. Such inductions are based on mutual compatibility, engagement and commitment.
Do we have to give an interview to become a part of the Program?
We have an Interaction Session from 6:00pm (reporting time: by 5:45pm) on April 8 and April 9 at Federation Hall. Please note that to be able to participate in the Program, it is necessary to take part in the Interaction Session on one of the two days.
So, friend, if you find the above arrangement suitable, please give us a call on +91-33-2555-4946 or +91-88205-34215 between 12pm and 4pm by 7th April for further queries and to book a slot (April 8th/9th)!
In case you have specifically been given a slot already, there is no need to call us again.
Looking forward to hear from you soon.

Through an initiative of Bhawanipur Swajan, Nandikar has, yet again, joined hands with some like-minded friends in the theatre fraternity to offer support to institutions and individuals engaged in social services.

Trina Lahiri, a young lady who has been fighting hard against the ‘king of maladies’ for some years, works for the poor and ailing children and never forgets to wear a hearty smile on her face. Shirampur Child Guidance Centre, an NGO providing education and vocational training to 160-odd physically and mentally challenged children by specially trained teachers, is struggling to meet its financial needs.

Nandikar has joined hands with Bhawanipur Swajan and the theatre groups Ballygunge Swapna Suchana and Drishyapat to support Ms. Trina Lahiri and Shirampur Child Guidance Centre and also to support medical treatment of Master Susamay Chandra, a blood cancer patient on the way to attaining quality life. Together we shall present a Benefit Festival featuring three plays from 20th March, 2013 to 22nd March, 2013 at the Academy of Fine Arts, Kolkata. Below is the schedule of the Benefit Festival:

Venue: Academy of Fine Arts, Kolkata

March 20 (Wednesday), 6:30pm: Madhabi by Nandikar
Drama: Bhisham Sahni
Adaptation and Direction: Swatilekha Sengupta
Lead cast: Sohini Sengupta, Debsankar Halder, Rudraprasad Sengupta, Parthapratim Deb, Sumanta Gangopadhyay
(Click here to go to the homepage of Madhabi)

March 21 (Thursday), 6:30pm: Belasheshe Kolahal by Ballygunge Swapna Suchana
Drama: Kajal Chakraborty
Editing and Direction: Sohini Sengupta
Lead cast: Swatilekha Sengupta, Biswajit Chakraborty

March 22 (Friday), 6:30pm: Oedipus by Drishyapat
Drama: Hara Bhattacharya
Direction: Anirban Bhattacharya
Lead cast: Debsankar Halder, Shejuti Mukherjee

Passes: Rs. 60, Rs. 100 and Rs. 150

Starting March 15, passes can be procured from the venue between 1pm and 7pm. To book tickets over phone, please call +91-8296133601 or +91-9836297606.

We shall, on this occasion, also bring out a souvenir with articles on theatre. We shall be obliged if you kindly help us with your benevolent support in the form of advertisements and donations.

On behalf of everyone involved in the Benefit Festival, we cordially invite you to be a part of the festival. Please come and enjoy the plays, stand by us and kindly join hands in supporting the institutions and the individuals. We also request you to kindly spread the word.

Thank you,

Nandikar family

Courtesy: “Ebela”. Published on December 09, 2012 on page 17 (Page 17 on this link)

By Rudraprasad Sengupta

As sequel to yesterday’s observation on Nandikar and theatre training, I must begin with yet another assertion.

I forgot to mention two very important facts vis-a-vis our work with Children and Young. First, every day I feel mortally afraid before beginning the sessions with all the young human beings around us – with huge potential and each unique in one’s own way – hugely expecting God-knows-what and my inability to usefully fulfil their inarticulate wish-lists but, then, the smiles shrieks, tantrums and caresses of these young souls slowly make me feel strong and useful. Permit me to be a little emotional: Every weekend with all these God’s Chillan around, with their hugs and howls, I ask myself, ‘Is this the Heaven?’

Now coming to the second part of the topic, we talk about -

2. Intensive Theatre Training for Youth (18+ to 30 Years)

Way back in early 80’s, Nandikar started its training programmes for adult theatre aspirants. One major reason for this was to induct young people into theatre fold (not necessarily in the Nandikar fold) since the initiators of the post-independence theatre movements were all getting elderly. These intensive training programmes, on one hand, created good many young theatre enthusiasts all around; on the other, the theatre community started to feel need for theatre training per se. Government programmes for theatre training started, some groups and individual followed suit. Soon, training became almost fashionable (sometimes useless dishes because of incompetent cooks).

Of late, the situation has changed. Not all, intent on training, are interested in theatre per se. Many of them want training to qualify for TV series or film debuts or modelling or working as MCs or DJs and so on. And why not?

Nandikar continues its Annual Theatre Training Programme for adults. The reasons fordoing so even in the changed cultural situations are as follows:

  1. As many young people – with no knowledge about theatre economics or any idea about the prospect of a theatre activist – often want to join Nandikar. Our stated position is that Nandikar can not admit anyone directly; one shall be inducted only when through this training programme we come to understand each other and agree to do theatre consciously and little knowledgably.
  1. This training may help young people to gain some efficiency in tackling TV Series and the rest of it.
  1. Very importantly, this training may help young adults to perceive and learn the ‘Art and Philosophy of Communication’ in their daily performances in the theatre called life. This is extremely important because schools and homes (sorry!) and paras (localities) do not offer systematic awareness and scope for practice of these very important arts of communication. For young adults, it is not yet too late to deconstruct their communication note gone askew or muted as they are young, they are not yet all habits, they are still fit for salvation!

By Rudraprasad Sengupta

As the senior most of a pretty long lasting (52 years) organization called Nandikar, often I receive inquiries and requests for Theatre Training and/or doing theatre under Nandikar’s umbrella.

These requests come from two segments:

1. Training for Children and Young (below 18 Years)

2. Intensive Theatre Training for Youth (18+ to 30 Years)

Guardians of children and young below 18 years want to get their wards in Nandikar fold so that they can hone their performing abilities. They are expected to become actors with opportunities occasionally to prance upon the stage.

YES, every Sunday we work with three separate groups of children and young in the age groups of 5 to 9, 9+ to 13 and 13+ to 17+. When each of the guardians profess that his/her child is very talented, we have to remind them that all children are very talented. And sometimes we add that we the seniors in our zeal, incipient competitiveness, superiority complex, etc, manage to ruin their talents.

So what do we do with these children and young? With the junior most group we play games, sing songs, and move in dances so that they have a taste of their childhood of which they are often deprived. Moreover, they start believing in themselves, in their uniqueness and realize that each of them has a centre in the midst of multi-centred community. In short, they learn self-respect, respect for others, community spirit, — all these joyfully and creatively through songs and dances and games.

With the senior group, the approach and practice are same. In addition, we try to offer participatory and improvisational journey towards practice of communication. They are required to learn skills of communication and the perception about how and why learning Communication makes us better human beings individually, socially and creatively. They learn the mystery and magic of ‘I and the World’, — the essence of Aham Swa and Soham.

Of course, occasionally all the three groups are offered to grease paint and cloth themselves so that they can do what is known in common parlance as ‘theatre’.

(Part 2 of this post is here)

By Rudraprasad Sengupta

In quick succession – despite continuing demand for Ajnatobaas and Madhabi – Nandikar has produced Amaar Priyo Rabindranath and Anto-Aadi-Anto. These are still being rightly termed as Nandikar’s latest. Yet a Newer Play – Hridmajhaare – has arrived.

How did it happen?  It all started with Supriyo Chakrabarty.  Supriyo, initially a trainee, presently a regular in Nandikar, obtained a moderate Individual Grant from the Culture Ministry to produce a play. Certainly a tough call for an individual! He got the text of As You Like It into Bengali, garnered some service from some actors, mostly free-lancers, and the cooperation from Bikash Biswas and his group Katha Prasanga from Gobordanga.

In his dreams Supriyo thought big, but wishes are mostly horses. Supriyo lacked organization and adequate resources. Nandikar provided the umbrella; Sohini Sengupta and Kamal Chattapadhyay took up the reins and a wonderful journey in togetherness started.

So far, for long decades, Nandikar has groomed many a group, nourished many an individual all around. Being useful Nandikar felt proud and strengthened, for giving is always receiving. Now, ironically yet happily, a number of free-lancers like Shyamal Chakraborti, Kamal Chattapadhyay, Bindiya Ghosh, Subhodip Guha, Anirban Ghosh and good many others are in our company to catalyze the production of Hridmajhare. It’s a new experience, a humbling experience, a journey in rejuvenation.

Hridmajhaare was premiered on July 1st 2012, 10.30 AM at the Academy of Fine Arts. Hridmajhaare – As You Like It in Bengali – is a no-star all-youth high-speed production. It exuded freshness, raciness and made the house roll and rock for about a couple of hours. Eulogies started pouring in along with few hyperbolic statements like, “Excellent, don’t miss. Best of all Shakespeare’s running, Lear included.”

Of course, we are happy, but by no means heady or giddy.

Hridmajhaare

Original play: William Shakespeare’s As you Like It
Bengali Adaptation:  Kanchan Amin
Light:  Sushanta Mondal/ Manoj Prasad
Set:     Bikash Biswas
Music:   Subhadeep Guha
Costume:  Rimi Majumdar
Make-up:  Ranajit Dutta
Movement:  Deb Kumar Pal
Cast: Shyamal Chakraborty, Kamal Chattopadhyay, Bindia Ghosh, Rimi Majumder, Anirban Ghosh, Tirtha Deb Bhattacharya, Debashis Roy, Anirban Roychowdhury, Biswajit Ghosh Majumdar and others
Direction:   Supriya Chakraborty
Design And Directorial Advice:  Kamal Chattapadhya and Sohini Sengupta

Nandikar’s Actors’ Training For the Young begins!

Focus: training on stage acting along with acquaintance with video and audio medium.
Trainers include: Rudrprasad Sengupta, Swatilekha Sengupta, Debshankar Halder, Sohini Sengupta and commissioned gurus from allied fields
Duration: 6 months
Orientation and dialogue: 3rd & 4th May, 2012 at 6 p.m. at Federation Hall. Admission thereafter
Who may come for the orientation: the young, aged 18-25 (relaxable upto 30 on a case-by-case basis)
Date of commencement: 19th May, 2012 at Federation Hall, 294/2/1 A P C Road, Kolkata – 700 009 (opposite to Rajabazar Science College)
Training days & timings: Twice every week, Monday 5 – 8 p.m. & Saturday 3 – 8 p.m.
Expected batch size: 30-40 trainees

For further inquiry, please contact 033 2555 4946 (12 noon – 3 p.m.)

Rudraprasad Sengupta at the Training in the past

Sohini Sengupta at the training in the past

By Rudraprasad Sengupta

About a couple of months back I witnessed Rangapat’s Production of Tathaagata, Mohit Chattopadhyay’s last (by no means the least) play. He has been ailing for quite some time. He finished Tathaagata from his sick bed (actually, the dead bed), writing one page one day, another day half of a page and some other day, only one dialogue! That was Mohit! One of the very best dramatists of our time, Mohit Chattopadhyay does not need an introduction to Indian theatre fraternity.
Mohit was very close to some individuals and some groups, whereas I was always in the queue, never a front liner. As a result, Nandikar produced only his adaptation of Eugene O’neill, and, that too, a somewhat indifferent creation. The best of Mohit, Nandikar could never work upon. Our loss! I worked in Mohit Chattopadhyay’s Galileor Jibon (via Brecht’s Life of Galileo). But that was, for me, only a side dish.

Mohit gave me a short shrift, even after his death. Mohit and I were recipients of Tagore Ratna from Sangeet Natak Academy; the date of investiture was 25th April, 2012. But tomorrow I shall miss him there. Once again he has given me a shrift! RIP.